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of climate change. >> oh dear. susan? >> federal government rate of the gibson guitar factory. they confiscated the merchandise because a small business took some wood -- that was the incorrect level of thickness. >> interesting. what a loss. >> the worst political theater? how the right turned benghazi tragedy into theater of the absurd. >> are you reading that now? >> i wanted to get it right and concise. >> listen to me now and watch this. understood reported story of 2012 the bright side of mexico. the bright side of mexico. but particularly its economy. you call mexico went down to a failed state on the program. now in the midst of a manufacturing rebound be exports up to 14%. up from 11%. creating jobs, boosting gdp and drawing mexican immigrants from the united states back home. okay. the most overreported story of 2012. pat? >> the election of 2012 primary and general election and the fiscal cliff. >> eleanor? >> political gaffes. i like to fire people. you didn't build that, corporations are people too my friend. and -- the -- what is it? the private sector is doing j
profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bl
a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
. the government gets the money from us. i do not see how they have the right to sit there and play politics with each other and try to make decisions that are going to just benefit them. maybe a small part of the population. this is the united states. we're supposed to be tried to help everybody. we cannot be scared of what is clear to happen to us when many people are barely able to meet their bills. they may have to be afraid of what is going to happen to them. what kind of government would do that to their people? they should try to make us feel calm. like we are really going to get something done. host: from crawford, indiana this morning. on twitter -- another tweet i want to read this morning -- jodi wrtes in -- we will be taking your calls all of this morning for this segment and the next segment on the "washington journal." we told you what was going on in the senate. here is "roll-call" newspaper and what is being prepped in the house today -- alan ota writes, the speaker made it clear -- that is what is going on in the house. let's go to charles on a republican line from maryland.
't think of going to anything else. and as long as we can function and show the world that we can govern as we disagree, that will be the example that will forever make our country the best and hopefully be a model for others to not think you have to take to the streets, not think that you need guns to have the government that you want but to show that peaceful transition can be done and also that we can have a lot of discussion, a lot of disagreements, but we can do it civilly, and i leave this body knowing that if we just remember the honor that we have of growing up in the greatest nation on earth, that we will know that it is our responsibility to give the same to our children and grandchildren. and it's the least we can do. thank you, madam president. i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent top dispense with the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president, i
originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferson meant when he talked about religious freedoms. host: ok. caller: freedom from religion. host: when you go to vote in a presidential election or congressional election, what are the big factors in your decision? caller: usually economic. i did not consider -- i don't consider religion unless it interferes with some legislation. it plays a very little role in my life. host: would you call yourself unaffiliated religiously? caller: relatively i am an atheist. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks th
and a bill to continue the controversial domestic surveillance program. then, will the government -- of nerve north carolina pardon the wilmington 10? >> it is not a secret an injustice has been done. now, governor perdue has an opportunity to right the wrong. we cannot go back to 1980. this is 2012. >> the north carolina governor is being urged to pardon a group of civil rights activists were falsely convicted and imprisoned 40 years ago for the firebombing of a white owned grocery store. the conviction was overturned in 1980, but the state has never pardon them. we will speak with one of the wilmington 10 who served eight years behind bars and it became head of the naacp. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama is set to meet with congressional leaders at the white house just three days before a year in deadline to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. some $600 billion in automatic spending cuts and tax increases will take effect if no agreement is reached. obama and the rest of republicans remain of
local government control. in the spirit of cooperation among members, -- members of both party the house-passed version of h.r. 6364 would have protected the d.c. war memorial and h.r. 6364 is amended -- as amended by the senate similarly will have no effect on the d.c. war memorial. in fact all the provisions regarding memorials have been removed from the bill. instead it establishes a commission to observe world war i across the country as we approach the centennial of the start of the war. i emphasize that the commission approach means that the reason this has been done reflects on nothing more than the fact that the commission approach -- approached two important commemorations almost always has been the -- the commission has been the approach. the usual approach, almost always, to important commemorations, and world war i had enormous effects on those who fought, on the nation, and on the world. more than four million member and -- men and women from the united states served in uniform in world war i. among them two future presidents, harry s. truman and dwight w.ize -- and dwight d
wrong, did not mislead, did not misrepresent, i dithe best with information united states government had at thete time. >lou: here's what ambassador rie did say five days after onl benghazi. >> the best information we have today is this was not a pre-planned, premeditated attack.th what happened initially was a spontaneous action to what had just transpired in cairo as a consequence of the video. lou: she said nobody is blameless. joining us now, fox news middlen east analyst. it is great to have you with us. your reaction first to her claim she did not misrepresent, did not lie about what happened in benghazi. >> she may be mistaking the version of national security given to her is well defined in the sense she said what she had to say, she did not commit a lie with the american public knowing it did, but on the other handinw there was an assessment made in washington prior to that the next few hours clearly this was a terrorist attack by armed people. in between those two there's a political decision not to tell the truth as to what happened for political reasons. that is something the
-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "roll call." "it could be reached over this weekend." were heard from the house rules committee chairman yesterday. they are taking steps in advance to extend these tax cuts. a deal could be on the floor today if there is an agreement. from "the washington times" this morning. "offers fly, but still no agreement" is the headline. mitch mcconnell bypassed senator reid to speak directly to the vice president
of their recruiting. >> they realize this but it would be hard for any government agent to say i'm going to support a buy polar agent who is sleeping with an as lamb i can radical. >> in some ways it highlights those things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and
between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the government. gregg: coming up we'll talk with republican nick mulvaney whose house budget committee is obviously on the forefront of the fiscal talk. so we'll try to get the latest from him in just a moment. patti ann: meanwhile, gregg, we have new warnings from the treasury department that if a fiscal deal isn't reached our government will have to turn to extraordinary measures when the debt limit hits its ceiling. $16.4 trillion probably on monday. fox business network's stuart varney joins us now. hi, stu. you say this is the big story people aren't talking about? >> it is a sleeper issue, patti ann. on monday the government officially runs out of money and it can not borrow anymore. so it will have to shift all kind of cash around to make sure they can pay their bills and maybe they can do that for a couple of months. means you can kick the can, eight weeks be maybe, until the absolute crunch comes. there are consequences to this. it could be that america will be downgraded again. after all back in august of 2011
at this moment is not in effect. the french government and francois hollande says, it won't make any difference. we'll rewrite the law using new wording and we'll catch more people in the 75% tax rate net. heather: stuart varney, i know you have a lot of work to do today. it is a busy day financially. thank you. >> thank you. gregg: what will it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people will be paying a whole lot more in payroll taxs. those are social security payroll taxs. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the u.s. government. the more you make, boy, that number really accelerates. heather? heather: another devastating blow in the fiscal cliff crisis, this mess, will be to the military. $500 billion slashed from the pentagon budget that is raising serious concerns about our national security. chairman of the house armed services committee, california congressman, bruce mckeown will weigh in on the impact these cuts will v that is live in our
. this morning they approve and extension of the farm intelligence v it allows the government to continue intercepting overseas communication. it extends legal immunity phone companies that help the government wiretap the domestic phone calls. president obama plans to sign the bill. when the senate is back we are expecting senators to continued work on the $60 billion hurricane sandy relief package. negotiations continue on avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. both parties head to the white house today to discuss the fiscal cliff with the president. it's at 3:00 p.m. eastern in the oval office. senate in recess until 2:00 p.m. eastern when the senate reconveneses, live coverage here on c-span2. >>> and right now on c-span2 a conversation with nebraska senator ben nelson who is retiring after two terms. >>> retiring senator nebraska ben tell me sop. years that began with the 2003 recount and reended with re-election of president obama. if you could think of the adjective to describe these years what would it be? >> clearly interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. but also f
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
the cultural revolution. why? he says, because then you knew the government was the enemy, now you're not sure. [laughter] so i said you already want to bring up about a democratic system. they said yes. i'm not a law teacher. so after they say how much they're all favored the market, i said that's a very interesting question, point. i favorite. i favorite, but i've noticed from what i've read that there are millions of people in china who make just a few dollars a day. and they are on the own land and they're not very rich really. and you have quite a lot of money i gather. i was told. and suppose they also look, we are in the majority, and justice money down you. we're going to take it all away from you and give it to us. and the one who started this, i said to you favor that? if that's the result. he said i am in favor of democracy, but maybe not right now. [laughter] so you see, it's like a tiger by the tail. so you start looking at the other side, and they are afraid of a certain kind of chaos or of a certain kind of, and so somehow you have to, you have to, now that, that is partly, that
is the federal government on?" rep. john lewis: i did ask the question. i did raise the question, "i want to know: which side is the federal government on? " because it appeared, in certain parts of the south, the federal government was not on the right side of history. it appeared that the federal government was not a sympathetic referee in the struggle for civil rights. we felt that the federal government could do more, the department of justice could do more, the fbi could do more, than just stand back and take pictures. we thought they could prevent some of the violence and protect people that were being arrested, being beaten and being killed. amy goodman: i'd like to play danny glover reading the excerpts of the speech that you didn't give. danny glover: "to those who have said, 'be patient and wait,' we must say that 'patience' is a dirty and nasty word. we cannot be patient. we do not want to be free gradually. we want our freedom, and we want it now. we cannot depend on any political party, for both the democrats and the republicans have betrayed the basic principles of the declaration o
groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protests over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff talks worried wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 51 points to close at 13,139. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3012. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: in egypt, although one side seems to have clearly won, citizens are still awaiting official results of the country's constitutional referendum. as the sun rose over cairo today, opposition activ
serve to, "embarrass the administration, destroy the energy of government, and substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junta to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority." good writer, that hamilton. but in recent years, the senate has been remade into a super majority constitution. disturb institution. you need 60 votes to get almost anything done. between 2009 and 2010, we had more filibusters than we had in the '50s, '60s, and '70s combined. and they're not filibusters like we think of them, where the senators go to the floor and debate an issue until they keel over from exhaustion. they're just obstruction. if you watch a filibuster today, it doesn't look like anything. it's the blue screen on c-span, the one with the classical music playing over it. you don't tune in to here an intense minority demand a great debate on the issue of the day. you tune in to hear a string quartet. senator jeff merkley, a democrat from oregon is trying to change that. he's got a proposal to force talking filibusters in the senate
this roiling improvisation taking place. on government interactions. all that -- of it unplanned. at the center you have a man and the city is without like a big temple complex. and you can find those things at the same time, this radical coherence and freedom. it can begin to do something, then new creative -- you great meeting -- create meaning that is substantial. >> one of the most beautiful things, we were talking about are backstage. the idea of cultural capital, considering we're in a context of the economics of culture. one of the most beautiful things about the festival is if you look at this idea of spontaneous order, complexity theory, there is a lot of simple things that go into that. creating convention -- complex a from simple rules. do not call a festival, called a city. -- call it a festival, called it a city. we have created institutions, rather, they created themselves. we formalized it. there are ways of building social capital. one thing we did is we said there's no commerce at our event. that is a heterodox economic model. and then we set let's take a step further. make a m
and scope of government in a way responsible to the voters of that midterm election. instead what we're almost certain to see is an expansion of government in the name of reintroducing it. we're likely to see much bigger government long term. we're not likely to deal with entitlement reforms as we need to do. as you suggest the president is pushing some short-term spending increases often in washington turn into long-term spending increases. gregg: but, steve, bill kristol, conservative, you know what, time to throw in the towel. you do not want to get blamed for raising taxes on 98% of americans. >> right. gregg: right? >> look, bill kristol is my boss and editor at "the weekly standard" and one of most handsome and well-regarded editors in the country as everybody knows. look, i think he was making what was, in effect a practical case. there are people who are making this case behind the scenes. you have seen, he said, get it over with. move beyond this. there are others saying absolutely not. republicans can't cave on the principle of raising tacks. i think interesting thing in wh
the deficit, not new government spending. shannon? >> how confident are the "cook's essentialsal" democrats about the ability to get this done? >> reporter: congressional democrats do not sound over confident. they recognize this is a heavy lift between the top two senators in the next couple of hours. but a leading new york democrat sounded cautiously optimistic. >> there is certainly no breakthroughs yet between senator mcconnell and senator reid. but there is a real possibility of a deal. i have been a legislator for 37 years. and i have watched how these things work. they almost always happen at the last minute. >> reporter: we are getting down to the left minute. the threshold for extending the bush tax cuts. president obama campaigned campn capping it at $250,000, raising taxes on those who earn more than $250k, but some of the discussion and it is buzz around capitol hill has been about perhaps going to the $400,000 mark. the question is, will you get enough republicans to buy in if that is the deal? shannon? >> thanks to mike on capitol hill. we will continue to check in. now to ed
test case for reasons. one is dpap the american government is so wonderfulfully transparent and carefully chronicled you can get information not just about every president but every person that almost became president and you can get the memos that you wrote to each other. i think we should do this and argue about it. i can see, okay, if it wasn't abraham lincoln who was likely to become president in 1860. i can get an answer. it almost certainly would have been william henry who was the secretary of state. that's great. i can go back and look at the memo he wrote to lincoln about what he wanted to do and what lincoln wanted to do and what was cone. i can get a good proxy for what might have happened if the ore would have gotten the job. measure what the impact of lincoln was. if you're thinking about individual impact, i don't think it makes any sents to say the person was here about decision was made therefore it's about them. if anybody would have made that same decision, it's not about them. japan attacks pearl harbor on december 7, 1941, franklin roosevelts has to decid
-- it will not be any more government bonds because we will be out of the debt situation. we saw it on the horizon. when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back on rates across the board to the wealthiest to the middle to the poor and he put to ban all wars on a credit card and we are where we are -- to banwo isa credit card and here we are. we are coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult -- led by unfortunately some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulson, can you please explain the role of derivative ofs to me and what happened and how we got into this crisis? he put his head in his hands and he said, not now, i will talk to you later. that is not a very encouraging thing when the secretary of the treasury puts his head in his hands and says, i cannot explain it now. we are coming out of this difficult time and, guess what, we are doing much better. we had an election. it was pretty clear people want to see us reach a balance here. so, as i stand here, i k
differences between the two parties about the role of government, should it be bigger or smaller? about whether we want lower taxes or more of a social safety net. so while we have seen the principles, the president, speaker boehner, and now senator mcconnell and reid trying to get involved in stages in the last few weeks, it has always broken down because they fundamentally disagree about the big ideas over the core of this debate. they're fighting between the two parties. and this could get resolved in a matter of days or weeks. but the big difference, the issues could really take months to work out. >> can it be resolved in the matter of few enough days that they meet that january 31st deadline? >> reporter: anything is possible. i always think of congress like getting the term paper in. they like to wait until the very night before it is due. and that gives them the motivation, as you know, covering them for so long. we think oh, 24 hours to go, it is over. they think we still have 24 hours, it is a lifetime. so could they get it done? yes, but it sure seems a heavy lift at this poi
, at least 10 states have passed laws that require people to show a government- issued photo id when they go to the polls. while supporters say the laws protect against voter fraud, others argue they're more likely to suppress voter turnout among people of color, the poor and proper id and find it harder to obtain one. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his lif
wisdom upon the leaders serving in government and good will on all principles on current negotiations. we thank you for the service of so many who work in this building whose labor provides the lubrication for the very public actions of the members of this assembly. though each deserves special mention, bless especially this day, jay pierson, who works his last day of 34 years of faithful service on the floor of the house. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house her approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from new york, mr. higgins. mr. higgins: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from south ca
in the country under the thumb of the federal government. congress debated this at length. they said if you're a -- a hobbyist or collector, a hunter in virginia wants to sell the gun to another hunter, they ought to be able to do it without being under the thumb of the federal government. >> if you want to check and screen more thoroughly for the mentally ill, why not screen more thoroughly for everybody and eliminate the fact that 40% can buy a weapon without any background check? >> we don't prosecute anybody under the gun laws right now. >> that's not responsive to the question, mr. lapierre. i hear you saying you can't do anything about high capacity ammunition magazines because it simply won't work yet you're proposing things that might not work. you're into the art of the possible because your standard is anything that has a chance of working, we ought to try except when it comes to guns or ammunition. don't you see that people see that as a complete dodge? >> nra supports what works. we funded the child safety program. we have accidents down to one-tenth of what they used to have. w
. that includes those budget cuts for most government agencies, the sequester. that may happen at least in the short term. it doesn't seem to be on the table now. also, the medicare doc fix. we don't know for sure if that's going to be in this deal or not. a lot of other pieces still on the table and in limbo for now. >> okay. lisa desjardins, we'll be watching with you, thanks. >>> as you may have guessed, uncertainty over the fiscal cliff is having a ripple effect from washington to wall street. u.s. stocks ended the session in the red on friday for the fifth straight day. a triple-digit loss for the dow, that tumbled 158 points. the nasdaq lost almost 26 points while the s&p 500 shed almost 16 points. >>> in washington, each side of the aisle is pleading its case directly it the taxpayer. both the president and the republicans talking about the fiscal cliff in their weekly addresses. the president said yesterday he was modestly optimistic about a deal, but here he seems to hint at his own plan b if the senate can't reach a deal. >> if an agreement isn't reached on time, then i'll urg
's government unleashes its most sophisticated weapons of the war. missiles from iran. we'd like to welcome our viewers here in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm candy crowley and you're in "the situation room." >>> i want to begin with a crisis you probably don't know is coming and, of course, is just about to hit. barring a last minute deal, union dock workers at more than a dozen major ports will go on strike this weekend. meaning just about everything we buy, from clothes to cars, can't be unloaded. the strike would impact 14 port along the eastern seaboard in gulf coast, including the port of baltimore and that's where we find cnn's brian todd live. the potential impact of this is pretty big. >> reporter: it's huge, candy. right here, this is one of the most crucial ports for commerce in this region. the sieger terminal. you can see massive container ships sitting in port. this is the port terminal with the bustling operations, containers still being moved in and out of here by a truck that are being offloaded from the ships here at the terminal. about
don't remember his name. the fact the could not remember what departments or in the government is a little forgivable. i did it for the same reason, in many respects. i wanted to deal with something i like, that i thought was worth pursuing. a long time ago i did a book called "the emerging republican majority.: it pretty much did emerge. i thought i would take the methodology that i used in the book to try to, with a good explanation, a realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, would you deal with one comment that i saw on the web written by weisburg a number of years ago. he called you a liberal. >> i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party for a long time there was a major progressive movements. but, liberal, i don't think so. outsider, antiestablishment, but not liberal and not merely conservative either. i would not accept either of those labels. i understand it does not stop with those labels. in terms of the politic
department and peher government programs. it looks like those cuts will go forward. what the president said today is 24 hours from now the senate leaders have to have a plan that deals with income taxes at a rate to be determined later, the threshold of that income-- and some federal benefit. and if they don't reach a deal, he will have his own plan "b." >> if we don't see an agreement hetween the two leaders in the senate, i expect a bill to go on the floor, and i've asked senator reid to do this, put a eill on the floor that makes tare that taxes on middle class families don't go up, that unemployment insurance is still ploylable for two million people, and that lays the dioundwork then for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps that we can take in ane new year. but let's not miss this deadline. neat's bare minimum that we should be able to get done. >> reporter: the president is pushing very hard, jeff, for that extension of unemployment benefits for americans who have been jobless for six months or more. they start losing that federal rsd starting tomorrow morning. and i
. i like to be involved. right now i'm really happy being involved from the outside in government, advocating for congo, taking the movie "argo" which has become a springboard for dialogue as our relationship with iran, as hillary which the said the most pressing foreign policy issue today. so i have a lot on my plate. >> schieffer: let's talk a little bit about this movie. i covered the washington end of that when it was all going on, and i must say, tbawfsz sort of overcome by events, later, greater events, but that is a wonderful story. and it's pretty much true, the way you told it. i mean, it's pretty accurate as far as the history. >> yes, the story is true. the story is absolutely true. there were these six hostages who escaped the embassy during the takeover, who hid out in the canadian ambassador's residence, ultimately rescued by the c.i.a. and trained to pose as a movie crew. i looked at a lot of research footage and i lobbied at your face quite a bit-- you don't look a day older than you did from 32 years ago. it's really exceptional. it's it the inception of our antag
government founded in natural rights. wilson was the opposite in his view. a little bit of a man involved subject. the movement started with president wilson and basically 100 years ago. george will analyze it in his lecture at the differences between the declaration of independence upon which thomas jefferson based the fundamental rights, the natural rights as announced in the declaration of independence. host: what is it about mr. will that makes him a hero to you? caller: he has consistently for decades espoused in billion form. fo brilliant writing he is a conservative in the truest sense of the word. he made clear the distinction between what happened in the french revolution and the glorious revolution that was parked of the continental socialism but will was exported to america as a result of the glorious revolution in britain. host: is there a call it that stands out that makes a person a hero to you politically? caller: he is not a hero because he has a high degree of native intelligence. he exercises that intelligence in what i think is a productive and true way of espousing con
. >>> in syria the military police chief has defected from president assad's government. this video shows a man identified as the official. i want you to take a listen. >> translator: i announce my defection from the regime and joining the peoples revolution because the syrian military has strayed from the core mission in protecting the homeland to become nothing but an armed gangs that kill and destroy cities and villages carrying out massacres that came out demanding freedom and dignity. >> pretty strong words. this would be one of the highest level defections in the 21 months they've been fighting. the prime minister and general were close to al assad and they also left the regime in recent months. first of all, tell us, this guy, i mean he essentially says they're thugs going after their own people. this seems pretty significant. >> reporter: well, that's right. he's identified on this tape as the general. aside from the video, we spoke with officials from the free syrian army today. they confirmed to us and helped this man escape syria and he's now in turkey. they say it's significant beca
of the bush tax rates and they go back to the clinton rates. the government would be bringing in more revenue, but that's going to take some time. that's not going to happen immediately and it's a relatively small amount in terms of what the government is spending every single day. that money would be spent pretty quickly. so, again, because we're now at this point where this is just a short-term deal, any of the major entitlement reforms that would actually bring major spending cuts are sngsly off the table right now. so, to answer your question directly without pointing a finger at either party, report the facts, there's no major spending cuts here, so it would not have a major impact on the deficit even if they get a quote, unquote deal. >> ed, your last question, your favorite show to do on fox news. >> i'm going to get in trouble. i love "the five" i love bret and i love shep and chris wallace-- >> and public relations-- >> let's go to mike emanuel also in d.c. and following the dramatic on capitol hill. surely this is your favorite show on fox, your debut on "the five", mike emanuel. >>
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